When you start seeing your worth, you’ll find it harder to stay around people who don’t.
Worth by Emily S. P.   (via soleilumiere)

asiotus:

Waiting for autumn to arrive.

Dress: Baroque

Blouse: Ladysloth

Parasol: Metamorphose

Bag: BtssB

quietandsarcastic:

Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

quietandsarcastic:

Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part IV)

And now for the side show… the STL County Council/police fail at being empathetic, and tone deaf white people are tone deaf (and white). #staywoke #farfromover


Picked up some glue sticks on the way home tonight, so I managed to make some accessories for later this month and beyond.
Thanks to my friend Claire for inspiring the hair bows down in the corner! Her bows are freaking adorable and I’ve been wanting some for a while.  Now I have two. :3
As for the roses, the tri-color monstrosity is to clip onto a hat, the green is for a belt buckle, and the plain white is for a simple brooch.
Still have a few more roses to put on my broom, whenever I can find a decent handle, so my theme is going to be “semi-religious witch with flowers and lantern” because I’m kinda addicted to OTT now.

Picked up some glue sticks on the way home tonight, so I managed to make some accessories for later this month and beyond.

Thanks to my friend Claire for inspiring the hair bows down in the corner! Her bows are freaking adorable and I’ve been wanting some for a while.  Now I have two. :3

As for the roses, the tri-color monstrosity is to clip onto a hat, the green is for a belt buckle, and the plain white is for a simple brooch.

Still have a few more roses to put on my broom, whenever I can find a decent handle, so my theme is going to be “semi-religious witch with flowers and lantern” because I’m kinda addicted to OTT now.

mostly-perfect:

So one time my dad bought a skeleton for Halloween, and one day he decided to place it in the kitchen to scare me and it went too far…

captcreate:

fatitalianbroad:

*BOOP*

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.

howtoskinatiger:

feienopteryx:

sammiwolfe:

firedanceryote:

angry-stray-dog:

howtoskinatiger:

"A spokesman from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta) has urged people to boycott the products. He said: ‘People would rather be caught dead than wearing Bambi.

‘Deer are beautiful animals, in contrast to the ugly nature of people who would sport their skin as an accessory to their own heartlessness.’

Managed deer culling is legal in the UK, and is used as a form of population control to prevent the animals starving or falling victim to disease.

But the Peta spokesman added: ‘Selling bags made of animals who were gunned down while enjoying a natural life… results only in greedy, arrogant deer skin sellers keeping deer alive each year just long enough to kill them so as to sell more deer skin products.’”

PETA once again showing their ignorance and stupidity.

These deer aren’t even being killed for their skins, they’re being killed because deer are hugely overpopulated in the UK and have no natural predators other than humans to control them. These deer culls are backed by hard science and are vital if we want to protect what little natural habitat the UK has left from overgrazing and damage caused by deer. Without culling the UK landscape would be stripped bare of trees and vegetation and then all wildlife would suffer. 

Making use of the skins from deer that had to be culled, as well as the meat, is an excellent way to ensure that none of the animal goes to waste. And of course, whether the skins get used or not the deer will still be killed

Also ‘rather be caught dead than wearing Bambi’ fucking PETA and their buying into the Disneyfication thing to get people to feel bad.

This is literally the reason I learned taxidermy and bone cleaning. So many animals are killed in culls, as road kill, etc and wasted. I felt it a mark of disrespect for the animal and a huge waste to simply let these animals be smashed into the road or thrown out like trash. Not all will agree, but using all parts of an animal is the most respectful thing one can do in my opinion.

I find it amazing that they’re considering deer fur accessories as “luxury” like no I’m sorry but deer are literally everywhere and I’m pretty sure owning the skin of an overpopulated animal that has hunting and culling seasons where almost anyone can get a license to participate shouldn’t be considered a luxury. For many people the meat and skins of deer are a necessity, and of course it was only a matter of time before somebody started selling accessories out of the skin for extra income.

What does bother me is that the fur in question appears to be spotted like fawn’s fur. Are they culling fawns or do adult UK deer keep their spots or what? Because even with overpopulation issues I’m pretty sure culling fawns isn’t exactly legal. If anyone has an explanation I’d love to hear it though!

I don’t know if this is what these bags are made of but fallow deer do keep white spots as adults! Fallow deer live in parts of Europe, but I don’t know if they are found in the UK specifically.

There are fallow deer, yes. Fallows are hugely overpopulated across almost the entire UK and cause a lot of damage to the environment, as well as frequently being hit by cars. 

Here’s some photos I took of fallow deer on nearby farmland; 

Notice the amount of deer in the background as well as the foreground! There numbers locally are really out of control and without culling their numbers would keep growing and growing. 

In some parts of the UK we also have sika deer which have spotted coats similar to the fallows in summer. Both sika and fallow deer are also non-native, invasive species in the UK so the need to control them is two-fold. 

not-rocket:

don’t leak nudes

leak the avengers: age of ultron trailer

Marie Antoinette, by Annie Leibowitz for Vogue, 2006